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CONSTITUTIONAL LAW

 

          Representation of plaintiffs and defendants in claims arising from state and federal constitutional rights.

          The following are examples of our representation in this practice area:

            Sprague & Sprague successfully defended a church which was sued in state and federal courts by another church alleging various constitutional violations arising from the distribution of trust funds.

            The Firm represented two Internet service providers in litigation against the Commonwealth Attorney General and others with respect to multiple constitutional claims -- including freedom of speech, search and seizure, and commerce clause claims -- arising from the Commonwealth’s seizure of certain Internet communications. This case also involved the applicability of the federal Communications Decency Act and Electronic Communications Privacy Act.

            We successfully defended a private development company and its officers and directors in a putative class action, civil rights lawsuit brought by a locality for allegedly violating the citizens’ constitutional rights in connection with the approval process for a major industrial development.

            The Firm successfully obtained the dismissal of multiple criminal charges against a state official on the basis that the criminal statutes at issue were constitutionally void for vagueness and obtained a ruling from the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania affirming the dismissal.